Resources

 
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Toolkits

 
 
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Healing Action Toolkit

This toolkit was created to collate, condense and share the lessons we have learned in ensuring that our direct actions are centered on healing justice. This toolkit is a beta version; it will develop in real time as we continue to uncover the implications for healing justice in our organizing. We extend our gratitude to the BLM Healing Justice Working Group and all the chapter members who shared your insights, your innovations and your struggles to support our shared knowledge.

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Chapter Conflict Resolution Toolkit

In the work that we do, there are many times where conflict can arise. It is our duty to ensure that we are mindful of how we handle conflict as it is inevitable. It presents an opportunity to grow and realign oneself. This toolkit was create to give guidelines to conflict resolution within chapters.

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#TalkAbout Trayvon: A Toolkit for White People

When we remain silent and on the sidelines, we are complicit in maintaining these unjust systems. Our work is to get more white people who support us to take action toward racial justice—and to change the hearts and minds of those white people who are not yet with us. When we #TalkAboutTrayvon, we tell grieving parents that we see them and acknowledge their pain. When we #TalkAboutTrayvon, we tell Black children that we are not afraid of them—we are only afraid they won’t get the bright future they deserve.

 

Readings

 
 
 
 
 
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When They Call You a Terrorist

by Patrisse Cullors

The memoir of Patrisse Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter and continues to live, work, create, and organize in Los Angeles and with BLMLA

 
 
 

Freedom is a Constant Struggle

by Angela Davis

By Black Power activist and radical intellectual, Angela Davis, focuses on contemporary freedom movements and helps to remind us that our work must be constant.

 
 
 

Black Power

by Kwame Ture and Charles Hamilton

Written in 1967 at the height of the Black Power movement, this text is THE absolute must-read for anyone engaged in Black Power work.

 

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